Episode 10 Recap: The Children

Disclaimer: There are no spoilers in this article. Any views or opinions expressed are based solely on where the Game of Thrones TV series currently is and no other knowledge or information is presented in this article.

THE CHILDREN

Last week’s episode took place in just one location and was dedicated entirely to one plot-line. At the other end of the spectrum, the season finale not only catapulted us into the plot-lines of almost every character, but also progressed each of these stories rather abruptly. Outside of Sansa, nearly every character was featured in the finale and each one had a major development in one way or another. In a world where we’ve come to expect rather slow character and plot development, this episode was a smack in the face — a major departure from any episode we’ve seen in four years of Thrones.

But, what was actually so special about this episode? Sure, lots of “stuff” happened pretty quickly, but was there something more to the finale than just tons of action? The answer is yes. There were several layers at the core of the finale which made the episode special and are worth discussing. First, the ways in which several independent plot-lines all of a sudden began to intersect. Second, the many different plot-lines to which the episode’s title, The Children, significantly refers to, and the way these children have been both imprisoned and liberated. And finally, the many ways in which this “game” has changed drastically in just one episode.

CONVERGING STORIES

The finale episode did not only offer up major progressions of each character’s story, but it also offered a taste of the way several of these previously independent plot-lines will begin to merge into one. In any other fictional world, the intersection of characters would probably not be worth mentioning. Why? Because from the onset of almost any story, even if we do not know the exact roles each character will fulfill, we have a basic understanding of the ways each character shares in the world that we are experiencing. And this is just another way that Thrones is completely unique from almost everything else out there.

Rather than a set of characters in a shared world, Thrones is composed of so many characters with story arcs that have remained completely separate from one another, existing in parallel. It’s almost as if we have been watching many different shows — each about a different character with a story unique and exclusive from every other character. Ultimately, this has left us to wonder when, and more importantly, how these independent stories would start to bleed into one another. But in the season finale, some of these questions began to be answered as we were offered a glimpse into the way several characters’ plot-lines will begin to come crashing together. And this — the way the pieces of the puzzle will start to come together — made the finale uniquely special from all other episodes.

Right out of the gate, the plot-lines of Jon Snow and Stannis meet face to face. For so long, we have experienced the independent journeys of each character. Prior to a couple episodes ago when hints began to be offered that Stannis was going to make his way to the Wall, did you ever stop to consider the story-lines of Stannis and Jon Snow coming together? Probably not. But that is exactly what happened. Stannis, a man once committed to taking the Iron Throne which rightfully belonged to him, he later realized that the war over the Throne was meaningless compared to the imminent war in the North involving the Night’s Watch, Wildlings and possibly White Walkers. And Jon Snow, a character who started as a boy and has grown into a man while overcoming his bastard issues, he has infiltrated the Wildlings before making his way back to the Night’s Watch, ultimately appearing completely willing to give his life to defend the Wall. For four seasons we have seen these two characters develop, completely independent of one another. And in the blink of an eye, just like that, their stories come together as Stannis arrives at the Wall and crushes Mance’s camp of Wildlings. The arrival of Stannis has breathed new hope into the war on the Wall, which was all but lost by the Night’s Watch. More significantly, it crosses the paths of Stannis and Jon Snow, and is one of the first hints at the way major characters might begin to intersect one another to reveal the roles they will play in the greater storyline.

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Similarly, the journeys of Brienne/Podrick and the Hound/Arya abruptly come together as Brienne stumbles upon Arya on her way to the Vale. For seasons now, Brienne has been on a journey to honor Catelyn Stark and find Sansa. Ironically, it is Arya that she stumbles upon rather than Sansa. Likewise, the Hound has been on a seemingly never-ending journey with Arya, arriving at the Twins just after the Red Wedding, and then getting to the Vale just days after Lysa Arryn was killed. And just like that, these journeys — ones that have developed over the course of so many episodes — come crashing together without any warning at all. But whereas the arrival of Stannis at the Wall gave us hope and probably felt good to watch, the clash of Brienne and the Hound’s stories was not as nice to watch. After Brienne insists on honoring her oath and refuses to leave without Arya, the Hound professes that he is a better fit to look after her. A brutal fight ensues in which Brienne is ultimately victorious and the Hound is thrown over a cliff and possibly left to die.

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In the Thrones world, we’ve seen plenty of good guys fighting bad guys. We’ve even seen bad guys fighting bad guys. But this might be the first time that we saw a good guy fight a good guy, which probably left most of us wishing the fight never happened in the first place. In and of itself, the fact that we are calling the Hound a “good guy” speaks volumes to his character development. If you go back and watch the first couple seasons of Thrones, you probably would not have guessed that you would have grown to love the Hound — but most of us have. And after we came to see the warmer, more human side of him, and the many ways he opened up to and cared for Arya, it was painful to see him go down like that — especially in a fight to protect Arya. And as he lay  there in brutal shape before the eyes of Arya, the irony of their situation could not have been any greater. Since season one, the Hound has been a name on Arya’s list — one of the people she has committed herself to eventually killing and crossing off her list. She has even told the Hound directly that she will one day kill him. Yet, when the opportunity presented itself, so much so that the Hound actually wanted her to kill him, she would not do it. As he pleaded with her to put him out of his misery, Arya looked on with cold eyes, almost immune to the immense pain you could hear in his voice. Emotionless, she took his gold and left him to die a more painful death than the one she could have offered.

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THE CHILDREN AND THEIR LIBERATION

In the Thrones series, the title of each episode is often significant and generally speaks to an underlying message or overtone within each weekly installment. Perhaps more so than ever, the title of the finale, The Children, has many meanings all rolled into one. The most literal meaning, the finale episode refers to many of the characters’ identities which have been defined by the parent-child relationship that they exist within. And generally, these relationships have been imprisoning to several of these characters. But, in the finale episode, things changed for many of “the children,” and several of them were liberated, while others were further imprisoned.

Perhaps more so than any other characters in the show, the three Lannister children have been defined by their roles as children, to none other than Lord Tywin. From the first moments we’ve encountered them, we have known the Lannister siblings as children — their identies almost completely dictated by the fact that they were Lannister children. More times than not, it has seemed that their roles as children have been already decided for them and they’ve often had no free will what so ever. Cercei was used as a tool of marriage, forced to endure King Robert in order to become queen and further the Lannister cause. Jaime was forced to serve on the Kingsguard to the Mad King. And Tyrion was forced into a life of ridicule. Each had a role to play forced upon them as children to Lord Tywin, and for the most part, it seemed as if there was nothing they could do to change this.

But all of that changed in the finale, and we begin to see some of The Children that the episode title refers to. It all begins as Cercei refuses to marry Ser Loras Tyrell, another marriage Lord Tywin is set to force upon her. However, it is not because of her personal preferences or desires that she refuses, but rather a decision dictated by the children of her own. With Joffrey dead and Myrcella shipped off to Dorne, Tommen is the only child she has left, and she refuses to lose him to the self-serving influences of Margaery Tyrell and Lord Tywin. It’s an interesting juxtaposition as the child of Lord Tywin, Cercei, stands up to one of the most powerful men and threatens to do whatever she needs to in order to protect her own child. She tells Lord Tywin the truth of her incestuous relationship with Jaime, and threatens that she will ruin the Lannister legacy by letting it be known to all. She then goes and tells Jaime that he is the one she wants; she no longer wants to hide the truth and does not care what anybody thinks. She liberated herself from the prisoner she had been as a child to Lord Tywin. And, in certain ways, she also liberated Jaime, who was forced to keep his love for Cercei a secret for so many years.

The liberating continues as Jaime frees Tyrion and saves him from imminent execution. While Tyrion was the one literally freed, this was equally liberating for Jaime, who has desperately wanted to save his little brother, but has been ultimately helpless to the will of his father, Lord Tywin, who wanted Tyrion dead. Like Cercei, no longer would Jaime be prisoner to the commands of his father, and he frees his little brother. Ironically, this leads to the death of their father and the ultimate liberation for all three Lannister children. But before he kills Lord Tywin, Tyrion stumbles upon Shae, who not only betrayed him during his trial, but is now sleeping with the very man who threatened to kill her if he found her with Tyrion — the very reason Tyrion was forced to send her away — to save her life. A bittersweet revenge, Tyrion kills the woman he loves, before killing the father that never loved him. With Lord Tywin dead, what happens next in King’s Landing? Who will claim the power that was previously held by him?

Though only in the episode for a brief moment, Khaleesi is another story-line that the The Children refers to. Once a child, Khaleesi has quickly become a mother, which has become both liberating and imprisoning at the same time. Stepping into the fire and hatching petrified dragon eggs, Khaleesi first became the mother of dragons. And much the way Lord Tywin ultimately could not control of the actions of his own children, Khaleesi was told from the onset that she would not be able to fully control her dragon children. Khaleesi used these children to become the mother, or “mhysa,” to thousands of additional children as she freed the slaves of Yunkai, Astapor and Meereen.

Khaleesi has has achieved great power, but is beginning to struggle to successfully navigate it. Freeing these children while governing them at the same time often do not go hand in hand, and Khaleesi is beginning to experience a great paradox. She conquered cities and freed the slaves, only to find out that many of them have lost their purpose as free men and do not in fact wish to be liberated. She has grown dragons, one set of children, who are causing chaos amongst her other set of children, the freed slaves. As Khaleesi learns that one of her dragons has killed the three year-old daughter of a Meereenese man, she realizes what she must do. Khaleesi became the breaker of chains, making her “myhsa” to the slaves she freed, but in order to protect these children, she now must impose another set of chains to her other children — the dragons. Just as the Lannister children had so long been imprisoned by their roles as children, it appears that Khaleesi is beginning to become a prisoner to the burdens of her role as a mother, to both thousands of slaves that she has promised to lead and protect, as well as the dragons that she birthed from the fire.

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THE CHILDREN (OF THE FOREST)

The more literal reference to the finale’s title is the Children of the Forest, a magical race of creatures that existed on Westeros prior to the arrival of the First Men from Easteros. Since the beginning of the Thrones series, there have been references to the Children of the Forest, especially in the North, where the current inhabitants are descendants of the First Men. But, it was entirely unclear, if not altogether doubtful, that the Children of the Forest still existed today. And just like that, we get first glimpse of the Children and the magic they possess.

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In large part, this blog was started to provide background on the 12,000 year history of the Known World — a history that is incredibly rich and detailed — one that can be fully appreciated from reading the books, but is pretty much incredible to grasp from the show. In each 1000+ page book, there is more detail and reference to the history that occurred prior to the time period that we are currently experiencing. In the show, at best, there are quick references via character dialogue — and if you do not already have an understanding of the history being referred to, most of these historical mentions won’t mean much. And, this history — this unbelievable 12,000 year history, it all begins with the Children of the Forest. They existed on Westeros before anybody else got there. For how long they existed, it’s unknown. But they were there when the First Men arrived 12,000 years ago. And, after a period of initial war between the Children and the First Men, they lived together in peace for 4,000 years, until the Andals arrived and pushed the Children to the brink of extinction.

Today, much mystery surrounds the Children of the Forest — they have not been seen for thousands of years and some believe them to be a myth. But, history tells that the Children of the Forest lived amongst the weirwood trees and derived their magic from the forests. The First Men eventually adapted the practices of the Children, honoring the weirwood trees and praying to the Old Gods. This explains why today, in the North, where most are descendants of the First Men, they still pray to the Old Gods and honor the weirwoods — practices and customs that were originally learned from the Children of the Forest.

Before being nearly wiped off during the Andal Invasion, the Children of the Forest played an important role, and during the Long Night, it was the Children of the Forest that fought alongside the First Men to push back the White Walkers. It is also said that the Children of the Forest lent their magic in assisting Brandon Stark, founder of House Stark, in building the Wall nearly 8,000 years ago. In short, the Children of the Forest are incredibly significant, and to learn that there are still some alive today in the deep North is the greatest reveal that we’ve seen in 40 episodes to date.

To learn more about the Children of the Forest, check out this page, which was one of the first ever published on this blog. I would also recommend checking out this timeline which will provide some context on the history of the world we are experiencing and how far back it dates.

WHERE ARE WE AT NOW?

As the fourth season comes to a close and we reach the approximate midway point of this entire magical journey, it is important to not only reflect upon this individual episode and the craziness that unfolded, but also to step back and reflect upon how this entire “game” has changed in just one episode. So, here’s a quick recap:

The episode begins where last week left off, as Jon Snow journeys north of the Wall to find and kill Mance Rayder. However, before he has the chance to, Stannis’ forces arrive and crush the small band of Wildlings at Mance Rayder’s camp. Presumably, Stannis used his funding from the Iron Bank of Braavos to strengthen his army and fleet of ships, which he used to sail back to Westeros north of the Wall. Wanting no more Wildling bloodshed, Mance surrenders, and per Jon Snow’s advice, Stannis takes Mance prisoner. Also of interest, through the fire, Jon Snow and Melisandre exchange a long glance — was this a foreshadow of something to transpire between these two characters? A lot is left to wonder, but in the blink of an eye, the entire situation at the Wall has changed completely.

In King’s Landing, we discover that the Mountain is in fact still alive, though inflicted with poison from a rare venom that was on the spear of the Red Viper. Qyburn tells Cercei that he believes he can save the Mountain; his methods are unorthodox and he acknowledges it will change the Mountain, though not for the weaker. Will he in fact be able to save the Mountain? And, if so, could Qyburn actually be turning the Mountain into a greater monster than he is already?

As one brother is saved, another is left to die. Though, we would have hoped it was the other way around. After the powerful development of the relationship between Arya and the Hound, we might have guessed that Arya would have tried to save the Hound. Or, at least have granted him his wish and put him out of his misery. But, she did neither and instead stole his gold, much the way he had done to his victims in the past. In this moment, we see Arya’s true nature. She doesn’t just talk about killing, she means it. In her heart and at her core, she has been completely hardened by all the death and despair she experienced around her, losing her mother, father and brother. She has no compassion for the Hound, even though he at times expressed compassion for her. And as she journeys on alone, she finally uses the magical coin given to her by Jaqen H’ghar two seasons ago, and says those famous Braavosi words, “valar morghulis,” meaning “all men must die.” Instantly, she is granted passage on the Braavosi ship and just like that, she is on her way to Braavos. What will happen when she gets there? And will she reunite with Jaqen H’ghar?

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Back in King’s Landing, after taking down Shae and Lord Tywin, Tyrion ends up with Varys, who he trusts to get him out of the capital city safely. Many of us have questioned Varys’ motives and whether or not he is a “good” character. During Tyrion’s trial, Tyrion reminded Varys that Varys once told Tyrion that he would never forget that he saved the city during the Battle of Blackwater Bay. When Tyrion asked Varys if he had forgotten, Varys replied, “Sadly, I do not forget a thing.” Additionally, it was Varys that attempted to get Shae out of King’s Landing, bribing her with gems. When she asked him why, Varys told her that he believed Tyrion was one of the few men that existed on Westeros who was truly capable of achieving good, and that Shae was a distraction to him. And, when Tyrion needed him most, Varys made good on his word, playing his part to save Tyrion, a man he clearly believes in. Turning back to return to King’s Landing, Varys hears the city bells erupt and realizes that Tyrion has committed a great act of murder. Rather than returning to this scene of chaos, Varys decides to join Tyrion on their journey to Easteros — Varys’ original birthplace and a location where he has many friends and resources, namely Illyrio Mopatis.

And finally, perhaps the most significant part of the episode, after a seemingly never-ending journey, Bran and company reach their destination — the great weirwood tree in the deep North. Just as they arrive, skeletons emerge from beneath the freezing snow, perhaps some sort of wights that exist in the deep North. Bran again showcases his ability to change into the skin of another human, fighting off many of these skeletons, before one of the Children of the Forest emerges, helping to protect them by shooting off magical rays of light. Jojen Reed is killed, though it is revealed that he knew the whole time it would end this way. After being led through a cavern of tree roots below the beautiful weirwood, Bran finally arrives to the three-eyed raven, who is now in the form of a mysterious old man. The man tells Bran that he has taken many different forms and has been watching each of them their entire lives through a thousand eyes. Though he will never walk again, Bran is told that he will fly. Naturally, tons of question marks are raised by this entire development. What exactly is this man and what kind of powers does he possess? Why was Bran specifically so special that he has been watched his entire life? What will his role be in the war coming and will he literally take flight, or perhaps he will fly in the skin of a dragon? Also, how many more Children of the Forest exist, if any?

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All in all, the season four finale significantly progressed the plots of most of the stories we’ve been experiencing, setting up season five in a major way. Between Stannis’ arrival at the Wall, Arya leaving for Braavos,  Tyrion killing Lord Tywin before leaving with Varys for Easteros and Bran discovering the Children of the Forest and the mysterious man, we’re in the thick of it now. For those disappointed with the lack of progression of Khaleesi’s story — don’t be. If you are watching the show through the lens of what you want it to be, rather than appreciating it for what it is, you are doing yourself a major disservice. As we’ve already touched upon, there are so many plot-lines, each which will organically develop at its own pace. Some will begin to intersect and mature sooner than others, while others may lead us down a longer and slower path. But, would you really want it any other way? If all the stories emerged at once, the Thrones world would be no different than most other shows on TV. It is the disciplined nature and meticulous development of each character that makes Game of Thrones so special. Two years ago Arya encountered Jaqen H’ghar and was given this magical coin. Did she use it in the following episode? Did she use it a few episodes down the road? Or even in the following season? The answer is no. It was not until two full seasons later that we saw that nuisance come to fruition. And when did, it makes it all the more powerful. It did not happen because the writers wanted to write it — it happened at the point it did because that is when it was supposed to happen. So for anybody getting impatient, take your eye off the destination and enjoy the ride that we are on to get there.

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Episode 7 Recap: Mockingbird

TYRION & JAIME

Episode Seven begins with an emotional exchange between Tyrion and Jaime, Lannister brothers that had grown accustomed to their high-born lives of power and entitlement. It was not long ago that Tyrion was on top of the world — more or less running the show in King’s Landing as Hand to the king, with Shae, the woman he loved by his side, and all the gold and wine that a man could ever desire. Similarly, Jaime had everything he could ask for — namely the woman he loved, and the hand that swung his sword from which his power derived. Now, he has neither of these things. And as the two sit in Tyrion’s cell, the deterioration of their situations is more apparent than ever. Everything has changed — Tyrion is powerless to the false verdict of a murder he did not commit, while Jaime is utterly helpless to defend and protect his own brother. However, the two agree that one thing has not changed — Lord Tywin would have once again gotten exactly what he desired had Tyrion stuck to the plan of confessing to the murder. Killing two birds with one stone, Lord Tywin would have been able to get rid of Tyrion by sending him to the Wall, while at the same time securing Jaime as a proper heir to Casterly Rock and the Lannister dynasty. However, after hearing Shae’s heartbreaking testimony, Tyrion decided he had nothing to lose and deviated from the plan, leaving his fate up to the gods in a trial by combat, ruining Lord Tywin’s master plan. As the scene comes to a close and we see the despair in both their eyes, it is sad to consider the unbelievable toll that being a Lannister has taken on both their lives. Their roles and duties as Lannisters have been dictated by Lord Tywin from day one, leaving them little opportunity for any kind of true freedom or happiness. But, for the moment, that has all changed, as Tyrion has taken the power and control from Lord Tywin and placed their fate in the hands of the gods in the imminent trial by combat.

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After realizing the sad reality that Jaime is unable to defend him in trial by combat, Tyrion summons Bronn and requests that he step up as his champion. However, Cercei has successfully manipulated the situation and arranged a marriage between Bronn and the highborn Lollys Stokeworth. Bronn’s already achieved knighthood and has plenty of gold — this marriage will solidify his status and put him in line to receive the castle of House Stokeworth. There is no longer anything Tyrion can offer Bronn that he does not already have, and in a final plea, Tyrion notes their friendship as a reason to fight for him. In response, Bronn states “Ay, we are friends, but when have you ever risked your life for me?” There is nothing left to say and the two shake hands, remembering the good days they’ve had together, realizing that this may be the last time they see each other. It seems like just episodes ago that Tyrion was a free man, using his gold to achieve anything he wanted, while Bronn was just a lowly sell-sword, subject to the power of Tyrion’s gold. Now Tyrion is locked in a cell with the possibility of imminent death, while Bronn is a free man with gold, knighthood and highborn wife-to-be…How quickly things do change in the Thrones world.

“NOTHING IS JUST NOTHING”

As Arya and the Hound continue on their journey, they come across a dying man, whom the Hound kills to put him out of his misery, telling Arya, “That’s where the heart is. And that’s how you kill a man.” But, before this, Arya and the man share some final words, as the man tells her that nothing could be worse than the slow death he is experiencing. With apathy in her eyes, Arya responds “Nothing isn’t better or worse than anything…Nothing is just nothing.” These are powerful words that demonstrate not only Arya’s apathetic attitude towards death, but also her connection to nothingness. Each time Arya has killed somebody, she has appeared emotionless — almost indifferent. And now, as she looks on at a man taking his last dying breaths, it is more clear than ever that she developed a completely apathetic attitude towards the idea of death, a concept that evokes much emotion in the average person. After losing almost every person around her, she has cut herself off from feeling anything at all towards the idea of death. And as she shares these words with the dying man, we see her unique perspective on the nothingness she feels after having lost everything — it isn’t better or worse than anything — it’s just nothing.

A moment later, two men appear in hopes of capturing or killing the Hound to receive the large bounty that Lord Tywin has placed on his head. After the Hound snaps the neck of the first man, Arya recognizes the second as one of the prisoners she freed along with Jaqen H’ghar. With her razor-sharp memory, Arya recalls this man telling her that he would “Fuck her bloody with a stick.” And as soon as she learns his name, she adds him to her list, before crossing him off a moment later by putting her sword through his heart. Again appearing undisturbed and emotionless at the sight of death, even death at her own hands, Arya continues to cross names off her list as she grows her kill count.

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Later, Arya suggests that the Hound use fire to burn his wound and prevent infection. Of course, the Hound jumps back at the site of fire, before telling Arya of how he got the burns on his face from his own brother, the Mountain. As the beloved relationship between these two characters continues to evolve, we see more emotion and sensitivity from the Hound than ever before. It was not the burns that scarred him the most, but rather that it was his own brother who did this to him, only for his father to protect his brother rather than care for the Hound. We now see more clearly that perhaps these two characters are not so different after all; both have lost their families in one way or another and are now out on their own. But with a large bounty on his head as a result of the soldiers he killed to protect Arya, it is unclear how much longer the Hound is interested in keeping Arya’s company. “No reward is worth this much trouble,” he tells her. That said, Arya is likely the only person that the Hound has had any emotional connection with since childhood, and in the end, the Hound agrees to let her physically care for his wound, symbolic of the the ways that their connection has also tended to some of his emotional wounds.

BRIENNE & PODRICK

Another unlikely duo, Brienne and Podrick are on their journey to find Sansa when they encounter Hot Pie, an old friend of Arya’s. After Brienne inquires about Sansa, Hot Pie tells them that Arya is in fact alive and likely with the Hound. Not seen since Ned’s beheading, it has been presumed that Arya was dead for some time now, and it is significant that Brienne and Podrick are now aware that she may be alive. Podrick states that the Hound is likely taking her to the Eyrie where he could receive reward from Lysa Arryn. Before leaving, Hot Pie gives them a bread baked in the shape of a wolf for Arya, something he had given to her once before they parted ways many episodes ago.

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JON SNOW

Jon Snow and the others return to Castle Black from north of the Wall, only to find continued scorn from Alliser Thorne. Speaking before the brothers, Jon Snow tells that the Wildling attack on the Wall is imminent and that steel gates will not keep out their army, which includes giants. Jon proposes that they seal the tunnels which would block out the Wildlings, but also prevent the Nights Watch from going north of the Wall. Lord Commander Alliser Thorne mocks Jon Snow and rejects his proposal, while ordering he and Samwell Tarly to patrol duty on top of the Wall.

“THEY CAN LIVE IN MY NEW WORLD OR THEY CAN DIE IN THEIR OLD ONE”

Daario Naharis once again makes a play at Khaleesi, bringing her wild flowers and telling her that he only lives for two things: war and women. He begs her to let him pursue his love of war, rather than merely patrolling the streets of Meereen; when she denies his first love, she offers him a chance at his second one. She tells him to get naked and although we do not see it, it is presumed that they finally have sex. Beyond the dicey implications of how sex could affect the dynamic of this relationship moving forward, this action was significant for Khaleesi’s character evolution. Going back to the first season, before she was Khaleesi, Daenerys was just a young girl who was forced by her brother, Viserys, to marry Khal Drogo. Still coming of age, Daenerys was forced into sexual situations against her will. And later, once she warmed up to Khal Drogo, she then had to learn how to use her power of sex to truly win him over. Her sexuality was a very large part of her identity throughout — in many ways, she was powerless without it. And now, as she has become Khaleesi, the Mother of Dragons, commanding an army of 10,000 soldiers, she has more power than perhaps any person alive. And for this reason, the sexual experience with Daario, one that came from a place of power and strength, was significant to Khaleesi’s character.

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The next morning, Jorah crosses paths with Daario who is leaving Khaleesi’s chambers. Ser Jorah questions how much faith Khaleesi has put into Daario — after all, he is just a sell-sword. Khaleesi tells Jorah that she has sent Daario and the Second Sons back to Yunkai to slaughter all the masters that have retaken the city. Ser Jorah objects and tells her that this would be no better than the barbaric crimes of which the masters themselves are guilty. He also reminds Khaleesi that he himself is guilty of slave-trade, a crime for which he was shown mercy by Ned Stark. Jorah adds that he would not be standing where he is today had Ned executed Jorah for his crimes, much the way Khaleesi is planning to in Yunkai. Moved by his words, Khaleesi changes her mind and decides to offer the slave masters a choice, “They can live in my new world or they can die in their old one.”

THE RED PRIESTESS

At Dragonstone, Lady Melisandre converses with Lady Selyne about the magic potions that she has used to trick people into considering the Lord of Light. However, the Lord of Light is still very real and these potions are only a gateway to get people to see the truth of the Lord of Light. Lady Selyne then mentions that she does not think they should bring their daughter, Shireen, on their journey to the Wall. However, the Red Priestess tells her that the Lord needs her daughter — it has been seen in the flames.

“THAT’S NOT A MONSTER…THAT’S JUST A BABY”

In the middle of the night, Tyrion receives another visit, this time from Prince Oberyn. The Red Viper first tells Tyrion of Cercei’s attempt to manipulate him, but he sees through her Lannister tactics, and what he sees is an opportunity for revenge. But first, he tells Tyrion a story of the the time he traveled from Dorne to Casterly Rock to meet the monstrous baby that was Tyrion. After having been described as a terrible monster, Prince Oberyn was dissapointed to see that Tyrion was in fact not a monster, but just a baby. Tyrion’s eyes fill with tears as he realizes that even as a helpless and innocent baby, Cercei wanted him dead; so many years later and nothing has changed. As Prince Oberyn has learned that Cercei has named the Mountain to fight on her behalf, Oberyn is eager for the opportunity to avenge the murder of his sister and her two babies. The Red Viper has been waiting for this revenge for many years, and the opportunity has finally presented itself, giving Tyrion a champion to fight on his behalf. And so the combat is confirmed: the freakish size and strength of the Mountain versus the speed and agility of the Red Viper.

“GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY, WHAT DO WE DO TO THOSE WHO HURT THE ONES WE LOVE?”

In the courtyard of the Eyrie, Sansa reconstructs Winterfell, the place she once knew as home. However, it is not long before Robin demolishes Sansa’s castle, just as the actual Winterfell itself had been destroyed. Sansa slaps Robin and he runs off, just as Littlefinger appears to reassure Sansa that everything will be okay. Sensing that he has not been completely forthright, Sansa again asks him exactly why he killed Joffrey. Petyr makes it very clear that he murdered Joffrey out of revenge as he states, “Given the opportunity, what do we do to those who hurt the ones we love?” He goes on to tell Sansa that in a world where love prevails over war, she could have been his daughter, but unfortunately they do not live in that world. And then he kisses her, as Lysa Arryn looks on.

Later, Lysa Arryn confronts her niece and becomes hysterical as she threatens to throw Sansa through the moon door. Petyr calms his wife before telling her that he has only ever loved one woman — “your sister.” He then pushes Lysa through the moon door, raising many questions about what his next steps are and how Sansa fits into those plans.

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Episode 6 Recap: The Laws of Gods and Men

THE IRON BANK OF BRAAVOS

After hearing about it for four seasons, we finally get first glimpse of Braavos as Stannis and Ser Davos sail to meet with the Iron Bank of Braavos. In desperate need of gold to fund an army, Stannis reiterates to the bankers his rightful claim to the Iron Throne. However, the bankers are uninterested in stories or rhetoric and prefer to stick to the numbers. With large loans already out to Tywin Lannister and the Iron Throne, the Iron Bank rejects Stannis’ request. However, Ser Davos is able to persuade the bankers by showing them the fingers that he lost as punishment for his illegal smuggling activities — a punishment passed down from Stannis which demonstrated his accountability. Additionally, Ser Davos pointed out that Lord Tywin is nearly 70 years old, and once he passes on, who will the Iron Bank trust to maintain order in Westeros? After receiving the loan and once again proving his value, Ser Davos visits Saladhor Saan, an old pirate friend that he recruits to join them.

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“MY BROTHER IS DEAD”

Yara Greyjoy and her band of Ironborn arrive at the Dreadfort to rescue Theon, only to discover that Theon no longer exists. After delivering a passionate speech to her men, Yara leads the ambush and shows that she is capable fighter. After killing several of the Bolton guards, they make it down to the kennel where Theon is locked in a cage. Despite seeing his sister and being presented with the chance to escape, Theon refuses to leave and continues to refer to himself as Reek. After much commotion, Ramsay Snow arrives and a fight ensues, ultimately resulting in Yara being forced to retreat, telling her men “my brother is dead.” The following day, Ramsay rewards Reek with a bath and tells him that he will need him to pretend be his old self — Theon — to help Ramsay retake the castle of Moat Cailin, a strategic keep of the North that is currently being held by the Ironborn.

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A QUEEN MUST RULE

Khaleesi begins to rule over Meereen as she believes a queen must. She holds court, only to realize that more than 200 people have requested an audience. One man complains of his goat herd which has been killed by Khaleesi’s dragon. Displaying her kindness and compassion, Khaleesi offers to pay him triple the value of the herd he has lost. More significant, we see just how large and ferocious one of Khaleesi’s dragon has gotten. Khaleesi then hears from a noble citizen of Meereen who tells her that she crucified his father, a man who had no part in the crucifixion of the innocent slaves. In fact, he states that his father spoke out against these crimes. Perhaps Khaleesi should have heeded Ser Barristan’s advise when he noted that she should consider treating injustice with mercy. Khaleesi grants the man his wish to take down the body of his father and give him a proper burial, significant in that it implies that Khaleesi acknowledges the mistake she made.

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A NEW COUNCIL

In King’s Landing, Lord Tywin meets with the Small Council, to which Prince Oberyn and Mace Tyrell have been newly appointed. Varys speaks of the whispers he has heard; the Hound has been spotted in the Riverlands and Lord Tywin puts a large bounty on his head. More significant, Varys tells that Khaleesi has sacked the city of Meereen. Cercei responds that they need not be worried of a young girl on another continent. However, Prince Oberyn disagrees — with an army of 10,000, three dragons and two experienced warriors guiding her, Khaleesi is a very real threat and Lord Tywin vows to take action. He also states the stupidity of Cercei’s decision to dismiss Ser Barristan from the Kingsguard after Joffrey took the Throne.

In the Throne room, Prince Oberyn and Varys discuss desire. Varys tells Oberyn, “When I see what desire does to people, what it’s done to this country, I am very glad to have no part in it.” He adds that without being consumed by desire, he has much time to focus on other things, before glancing at the Iron Throne. As usual, it is unclear whether we can trust the sincerity of the words that Varys speaks.

“I’M GUILTY OF BEING A DWARF”

Tyrion’s trial begins and several people testify against Tyrion, including Ser Meryn Trant, Grand Maester Pycelle, Cercei and Varys. Most of the testimony was fabricated or taken out of context, with the clear goal of trying to make Tyrion appear guilty. Margaery was shown several times, looking uneasy as she watched what was transpiring; after all, she is one of the very few people who know the actual murderer of Joffrey, and that Tyrion is indeed innocent.

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During the trial’s recess, Jaime tells Lord Tywin that he cannot let Tyrion be executed when found guilty. Should Lord Tywin spare the life of his brother, Jaime is willing to abandon his position on the Kingsguard and return to Casterly Rock to be the heir that Lord Tywin does not have otherwise. Previously, this is something that Jaime would have never considered. His knighthood on the Kingsguard and being close to Cercei were all that ever mattered to him. But now, everything has changed and it appears that Jaime is willing to make sacrifices to keep his brother alive.

Jaime tells Tyrion that he must confess to the murder and plead for mercy and that Lord Tywin will spare his life. However, things go awry as Shae takes the stand as a final witness. Telling lie after lie, Shae seals Tyrion’s fate by telling that he and Sansa plotted the murder of Joffrey and that he took Shae as his whore. Even with the prospect of possible execution looming, Tyrion appears more hurt by the betrayal of the woman he loved. He calls her name and the two lock eyes — almost as if to plead for her not to go through with this and to tell her that he still loves her. Coldly, she responds that she is “just a whore,” repeating back the words Tyrion had to tell her in order to end the relationship and save her life. Again, we see that the romantic ideals of love do not always have fairy-tale endings.

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Finally, in what was one of the most powerful scenes to date, Tyrion confesses his guilt. He confesses not to the murder of Joffrey, but rather the “monstrous crime” of being a dwarf. In a world where rhetoric is commonplace and the truth is rarely spoken, Tyrion no longer cares to hold back and he puts all the cards on the table in front of the entire courtroom. Calling out his father, sister, the people of King’s Landing and even Shae, Tyrion appears to have nothing to lose and gives an impassioned speech, “I did not kill Joffrey, but I wish that I had. Watching that vicious bastard die gave me more relief than a thousand lying whores. I wish I was the monster you think I am. I wish I had enough poison for the whole pack of you. I would gladly give my life to watch you all swallow it. I will not give my life for Joffrey’s murder and I know I’ll get no justice here, so I’ll let the gods decide my fate. I demand a trial by combat.”

Once again, Tyrion’s fate will be decided via trial by combat, the same way it was at the Eyrie when Bronn defeated his opponent and won the freedom of Tyrion. With almost all of King’s Landing seemingly against Tyrion, who will champion his cause and fight to defend his life? And who will fight for Cercei to put an end to Tyrion for once and for all?

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Episode 4 Recap: Oathkeeper

KILL THE MASTERS

Episode Four begins with a conversation between Missandei and Grey Worm, both of whom were born into slavery, but now serve freely under Khaleesi. Missandei recollects her home and notes that she might one day return, while Grey Worm has no memory of his life prior to being a slave and expresses no desire to ever return to his birthplace. After Khaleesi tells Grey Worm “it is time,” Grey Worm and the Unsullied infiltrate the city of Meereen through the sewage system, and rally the Meereneese slaves while providing them with weapons. As Khaleesi once preached to the Unsullied, the Unsullied now preach to the Meereneese: freedom cannot be given, it must be taken back by the slaves.

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After the slaves uprise and kill many of the masters, Khaleesi successfully takes the great city of Meereen and grows her loyal following of freed slaves. Despite Ser Barristan’s suggestion to respond to injustice with mercy, Khaleesi boldly exclaims that she will treat injustice with justice, before pinning up 163 of the masters to the mile-markers leading to Meereen. An extremely powerful final image, we see Khaleesi has ascended the Great Pyramid of Meereen, overlooking the city she has conquered — the bronze harpy, once the symbol of Meereen, has now been replaced with the flag of House Targaryen.

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Many of us might be thinking “Great. Big deal, Khaleesi sacked another city and freed some more slaves.” We might be getting a bit bored with her journey — one that seems like it’s been going on forever and is just more of the same each time she reaches a new slave city. And that is exactly why it is important to stop and process the massive feats that Khaleesi has accomplished. She has now sacked three of Easteros’ most powerful civilizations — Astapor, Yunkai and Meereen — while freeing hundreds of thousands of slaves and increasing her power, resources and following. And, arguably more important than what she has accomplished is how she has accomplished it. The range of attributes displayed by Khaleesi has been astounding. She has been loving and compassionate, yet unafraid to be fierce and bold when needed. Wise and calculated in every decision made, yet also unafraid to admit to what she does not know. Selfless in wanting to liberate those sentenced to a life of slavery, yet unrelenting in serving justice to those who have enslaved others. Calculated but unafraid; unsure but completely faithful; compassionate but fierce — as Ser Jorah once told her “A thousands years could come and go without ever seeing a ruler like you.”

KING’S LANDING

In King’s Landing, Jaime visits the imprisoned Tyrion, after Bronn tells Jaime that Jaime was Tyrion’s first choice in his trial by combat at the Eyrie. Though Jaime appears to believe that Tyrion is innocent, he also appears helpless and limited in the ways he can assist. Once one of the more powerful figures of Westeros, Jaime’s influence and resources seem to be deteriorating. He also appears helpless with Cercei, who demands that Jaime bring her the head of Sansa, who she believes also played a part in the murder of Joffrey. In such a short time, Jaime’s world has been turned upside down — a father that has disowned him, a sister who resents him for things he had no control over and a brother that he is too weak to help. Nonetheless, we continue to see some of the good in Jaime as he presents Brienne with his Valyrian sword, which she names Oathkeeper, before setting off with Podrick Payne to find Sansa and get her to safety.

Also at King’s Landing, Lady Olenna sits with Margaery and alludes to the fact that she played a part in the murder of Joffrey. She says this just as she rearranges Margaery’s necklace — much the same way she touched Sansa’s necklace during the wedding — a necklace that we now know was produced by Lord Baelish, containing a vile of poison that killed Joffrey. So there it is — we now know exactly how Joffrey was killed. Littlefinger had a necklace created with one of the jewels actually being a vile of poison. Ser Dontos played his part, presenting the necklace to Sansa as a family heirloom. Lady Olenna was in on it, and removed the vile from Sansa’s necklace during the wedding and put the poison into Joffrey’s wine cup.

Lady Olenna, removing the poison vile from Sansa's necklace

Lady Olenna, removing the poison vile from Sansa’s wedding

Lady Olenna rearranging Margaery's necklace as she admits to her role in Joffrey's death

Lady Olenna rearranging Margaery’s necklace as she admits to her role in Joffrey’s death

She also tells Margaery of the importance of forging a relationship with Tommen and winning over his allegiance. As things come to light, we see the Tyrells emerge as cunning and calculated, quietly making moves to “play the game” and grow their power. Late in the night, Margaery visits Tommen and plants a seed, telling him that it will be important that they are able to have secrets that are kept from Cercei.

“A MAN WITH NO MOTIVE IS A MAN NOBODY SUSPECTS”

These were the words spoken by Littlefinger as he continues to reveal to Sansa the details of the plan he has plotted. Lord Baelish takes responsibility for the murder of Joffrey and tells Sansa that they are en route to the Eyrie, where he will marry Lysa Tully, sister of the Catelyn, the woman he has loved since childhood. When Sansa asks Littlefinger why he would play a part in the murder of Joffrey when the Lannisters had given him so much power, he explains the importance of never letting anybody know his motives as to remain unsuspecting. Sansa doesn’t believe what he is saying, and he goes on to admit the truth — that he is a man willing to risk everything to achieve what he wants. When Sansa asks him what it is that he wants, he tells her “Everything.” Now free of the powers of King’s Landing, we see the truth of Littlefinger — he is a man whose ambitions are rivaled only by the means he is willing to exercise to achieve these ambitions.

“LET THE MUTINEERS TAKE CARE OF SNOW…”

Jon Snow continues to impress upon the importance of going north of the Wall to eliminate the mutineers at Craster’s Keep. Brothers of the Night’s Watch prior to their rebellion, these mutineers know all the secrets of the Wall and the Night’s Watch. Should Mance Rayder and the Wildlings get this information out of them, they would have all they need to march on the Wall and crush the Night’s Watch. Likely out of dislike for Jon Snow, acting Lord Commander Alliser Thorne rejects Snow’s proposed plan, until Janos Slynt points out that Thorne will not be Lord Commander forever as there will be a vote for new Lord Commander after the murder of Lord Commander Mormont. Slynt points out that Snow is very well liked and could be elected new Lord Commander. To avoid this, he suggests that Thorne approve Snow’s plan to march to Craster’s Keep and let the mutineers “take care of him.”

Acting Lord Commander Alliser Thorne and Janos Slynt

Acting Lord Commander Alliser Thorne and Janos Slynt

After Jon Snow gives a passionate speech about the unjust murder of Lord Commander Mormont, who was a father to them, several of the brothers of the Night’s Watch agree to join Snow, including Locke, one of Roose Bolton’s men, who is posing as a new recruit of the Night’s Watch, but is really there on a mission to find Bran and Rickon.

Locke, pretending to be a recruit of the Night's Watch

Locke, pretending to be a recruit of the Night’s Watch

CRASTER’S KEEP

We finally see what’s been going on at Craster’s Keep since the mutiny that took place last season. Karl, once a brother of the Night’s Watch, appears to be calling the shots. The men have taken Craster’s daughters/wives as captives, raping and beating them. We also see that they’ve captured Ghost, the direwolf of Jon Snow. When Karl is presented with a baby boy, the last of Craster’s sons, he is told of the ritual that gives all  of Craster’s male babies to the “gods,” referring to the White Walkers. After the baby is placed out in the forest, Bran and company hear the crying baby, and Bran skinchanges into Summer to explore the situation, but falls into a trap just after seeing Ghost. Insisting that they move closer, Bran gets the group captured and is forced to give up his identity after Karl holds a knife to Meera.

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FURTHER NORTH

Since the second season, we’ve known that Craster leaves his male babies in the forest for the White Walkers to take. Yet, it’s been unclear what exactly they do with these babies. Do they eat them? Sacrifice them? Well, in the final scene of the episode, we got an answer to this question — a glimpse of something that never took place in the books. As a White Walker marches on his dead horse with the baby in hand, we get the feeling that we are now in the very deep North, perhaps the Land of Always Winter — the most northern part of Westeros — a region that is always stuck in winter and where it is said the White Walkers come from. The White Walker arrives at what looks to be a mysterious ice city or castle and we finally get some glimpse into where the White Walkers might reside.

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As the baby is placed in the middle of what we would believe to be an altar of some sorts, another creature comes for the baby. It is assumed that this creature was a White Walker, but clearly had a much different appearance from the White Walkers we’ve seen thus far. He appeared to be wearing all black clothing, different from that of the White Walkers. His eyes were a much deeper blue and he had spikes coming out from his head, versus the long grey hair of the White Walkers we have seen thus far. As such, we are left to wonder what exactly this creature is — perhaps a leader or god of the White Walkers? Or perhaps a creature greater than the White Walkers, which appear more zombie-esque than did this creature.

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Pressing a finger to the face of the baby, the baby’s eyes turn a deep blue, like that of the White Walkers and it appears that we may have just witnessed how a White Walker is created.

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It is interesting to note, that we actually got a glimpse of this creature two episodes ago during Bran’s prophetic vision sequence. As greenseers do, Bran had a vision of the future and saw this White Walker’s reflection in the ice, before it actually happened.

An image from Bran's vision, that we now realize is the face of this creature reflecting in the ice

An image from Bran’s vision, that we now realize is the face of this creature reflecting in the ice

Episode 3 Recap: Breaker of Chains

SANSA’S GREAT ESCAPE

As the episode begins, Sansa, led by Ser Dontos, attempts a suspenseful escape of King’s Landing — the torturous prison that has been her home for what seems like years. For so long, Sansa has dreamed of a hero freeing her and escaping the cruel and miserable life she has been forced to live in the capital. And now, that moment has finally arrived. Yet, as she finally makes it out onto the open water, things appear a bit more eerie and unsure. The scene becomes dark and a foggy haze fills the air. We soon learn that Ser Dontos was following the orders of Littlefinger, who plotted the rescue and escape of Sansa. Though, Lord Baelish’s motives are unclear, and Sansa appears wary, especially after Littlefinger kills Ser Dontos, the unlikely hero that saved her life. Littlefinger holds Sansa close and tells her, “You are safe now with me, sailing home.”

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“AM I STILL QUEEN?”

Margaery sits with her grandmother, Lady Olenna, asking her whether she is still the queen, now that Joffrey is dead. Lady Olenna confirms that she is still technically the queen, and that the death of Joffrey was more pleasant than would have been a life married to him. She also reminds Margaery that the Tyrell alliance is very important to the Lannisters, and that a life married to Tommen, rather than Joffrey, will be better for Margaery.

ONE KING DIES AND ANOTHER KING IS READIED

In the Great Sept of Baelor, overlooking the corpse of Joffrey, Lord Tywin questions Tommen about the virtues that make a good king. As Tommen mentions several characteristics, such as strength, holiness and justice, Tywin points out many great kings that possessed each of these virtues, but ended up dying or being killed. Finally, Tommen understands it is wisdom, the characteristic that all these kings lacked. Tywin points out that the wisest of kings acknowledge what they do and do not know. “A wise young king listens to the advice of his counsel until he comes of age. The wisest of kings continue to listen long thereafter.” As Tywin walks out with Tommen, Cercei looks on, perhaps realizing that she has just lost another son to the “game” of thrones.

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As Jaime clears the Sept, he and Cersei stand over the body of their dead son — a son that Jaime was never able to truly father. Cersei insists that Tyrion has murdered Joffrey and asks Jaime to kill him for it. Jaime refuses and defends Tyrion as their brother, who will receive a fair trial. As her grieving turns to lust, Cersei kisses Jaime, but pulls away after being reminded of his golden hand. Jaime exclaims “You are a hateful woman. Why have the gods made me love a hateful woman?” He then forces himself upon her, tired of being rejected and pushed away.

“I JUST UNDERSTAND THE WAY THINGS ARE”

As Arya and the Hound continue towards the Eyrie, Arya asks him where he will go once they reach their destination. He says that he has considered crossing the Narrow Sea and becoming a sellsword in Easteros. Arya responds that she too would like to go to Easteros and that she has friends in Braavos. As they stumble upon a modest man of the Riverlands, Arya pretends that the Hound is her father, a man who fought for the Tullys of Riverrun. Believing they support the same houses, the man takes in Arya and the Hound. Over dinner, the man discusses the Red Wedding and reminds that Walder Frey committed sacrilege that day, breaking the ancient and sacred law of Guest Right. “The gods will have their vengeance and Walder Frey will burn in hell for what he did.” The man also speaks of the impending attacks from Wildling raiders and mentions that the “whole country has gone sour.” The man offers the Hound fair wages for fair work, but the Hound rather steal the man’s silver than work for it. As expected, Arya is outraged after the Hound steals from the innocent man who took them in, and as viewers, we were too. But, as happens so often in this world, our perspective quickly shifts after the Hound explains himself. “They will both be dead come winter and dead men have no need for silver.” After Arya tells him that he is the worst shit in the Seven Kingdoms, he poignantly replies “There are plenty worse than me. I just understand the way things are. How many Starks have they got to behead before you figure it out?”

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Like the juxtaposition of their relationship as a whole, this powerful exchange underscores the diametrically opposed philosophies of these two characters. Arya, a character fighting desperately to defend the ideals of the world as she sees it — more than anything, wanting to achieve justice and preserve whatever good is left around her. Versus the Hound, a character with a more realistic perspective of the world around him. He has been exposed to the evils that exist and understands the way things are. In his dialogue to Arya, he points out that the romantic ideals of House Stark have gotten many of them killed, and perhaps it is time for Arya to abandon these notions and to start realizing the truths of the world around them — and what must be done to stay alive.

WE NEED AN ARMY

At Dragonstone, Stannis receives word of the death of King Joffrey and believes this to be another validation of the magic of the Lord of Light. Though, time is running out and he tells Ser Davos, “If I do not press my claim, my claim will be forgotten. I will not become a page in somebody else’s history book.” Ser Davos promises to raise an army for Stannis and has the idea to seek from the Iron Bank of Braavos the funding needed to raise an army of sellswords.

LORD TYWIN & PRINCE OBERYN

Back in King’s Landing, we continue to see the way the Dornish customs differ from the rest of Westeros, as Prince Oberyn enjoys the sex of both men and women. The room clears as Lord Tywin enters to discuss more important matters with Prince Oberyn. After discussing the murder of Oberyn’s sister, Elia, and her two babies, Lord Tywin denies giving those orders to the Mountain. Tywin proposes an allegiance: he will provide Prince Oberyn the opportunity to serve justice to the Mountain, if Oberyn will serve as a judge to Tyrion’s trial and help serve justice to the king’s assassin. However, this arrangement is only a microcosm of the alliance that must be strengthened between between Dorne and the rest of Westeros, should they want to survive the impending evils that Lord Tywin speaks of. He tells that Stannis still presents a threat, while Wildlings march south from beyond the Wall, and across the Narrow Sea Khaleesi has raised three dragons. Tywin reminds that Dorne was the only one of the Seven Kingdoms which Aegon was unable to conquer during his Conquest, and that Dorne and the rest of Westeros need each other.

TYRION & PODRICK

Tyrion’s squire, Podrick Payne, visits Tyrion in his cell and informs him of the trial that is to take place. Podrick was offered knighthood in exchange for testifying against Tyrion, though Podrick refuses the offer. Fearing for his safety, Tyrion demands that Podrick leaves King’s Landing. Tyrion tells him that this is farewell and with much emotion, tells him that “there has never lived a more loyal squire.” In this moment, our perspective once again shifts as we realize the power of this relationship — one that we probably took for granted and never gave much thought. Perhaps more so than anybody else, Podrick knows that beneath all the wine and whores, Tyrion is a good man with a soft heart. And conversely, Tyrion recognizes the unwavering loyalty of Podrick and the true care that he has for Tyrion. And just like that, after all those years, Tyrion must insist that this is farewell.

THE WILDLINGS RAID

Further north, we see the first major Wildling raid on a small village as they savagely murder the men, women and children. There is a clear vengeance about them — they are coming for blood and appear unwilling to let anything get in their way. They spare one child and tell him to run for Castle Black and let the Night’s Watch know that the Wildlings are coming.

When the Night’s Watch find out, they first call for retaliation, but Jon Snow reminds them that if the Wildings get past the Wall, they will raid a thousand more villages before they come upon an army that can stop them. As such, they cannot leave the Wall — they must stay put and prepare for the Wildlings that are coming. However, a moment later two brothers return from beyond the Wall — brothers we have not seen since the mutiny at Craster’s Keep which resulted in the murder of Lord Commander Mormont. They inform the Night’s Watch that the brothers who conspired are still at Craster’s Keep and Jon Snow tells that they now must go north of the Wall to murder these brothers. It is a matter of security — they know the truth that there are only about 100 men at the Wall, and if Mance Rayder were to learn this truth, he would descend upon the Wall immediately and smash the depleted army of the Night’s Watch.

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BREAKER OF CHAINS

Khaleesi finally arrives at Meereen with her armies, and we see grand city for the first time — reminiscent of an ancient Egypt with great pyramids. Meereen sends out a rider to champion the city and Daario Naharis is selected by Khaleesi as her champion, after Grey Worm, Ser Barristan and Ser Jorah all offer to fight for her. A strategic fighter, Daario Naharis kills with ease the champion of Meereen, setting the stage for Khaleesi’s speech. Rather than speaking to the masters, she speaks directly to the slaves, telling them that it is not her, but rather their masters who are the enemy. She notes the freed slaves of the city of Yunkai and Astapor that now stand behind her and offers them the same opportunity. She tells them, “I bring you a choice. And I bring your enemies what they deserve.” She then catapults into the city dozens of barrels filled with broken slave chains. The episode ends as one slave picks up the broken chain, realizing the immense power and symbolism of a chain that has been broken, before looking back at his master.

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